Posted in Learning, Reading, Writing

How to improve your written English skills

Writing in English is typically thought to be easier than speaking in English by many language learners. Usually, this simply means that people find it easier to write correctly when it comes to grammar, but they ignore fluency and readability. These are crucial if you plan to continue your education in an English-speaking country or if you seek a career that demands English.

1)Write as if you were speaking.

Although this isn’t always the case, writing like you talk can help improve the fluidity and readability of your workThat doesn’t imply you should use a lot of slang terms and uh, eh, and er in your writing. However, consider how people speak in basic English and how natural it sounds, and strive to achieve the same effortless flow in your writing.

2) Acquire new vocabulary.

It goes without saying that expanding your vocabulary will help you write with more confidence and fluency. Create a personal dictionary if you haven’t already. Write down and translate any unfamiliar words you come across, then test yourself to see how many you can recall before utilizing them in your writing and interactions.

3)Make it a habit to write every day.

Practice makes perfect, as the saying goes. So the only way to get better at writing is to keep doing it. Even 5 or 10 minutes each day, if done consistently, will significantly enhance your written English. You may keep an English-language journal, write a blog about your experiences learning English and living in a new country, or even begin creating your social media bio.

4)read lots

You can enhance your writing skills even if you don’t write. You may improve your vocabulary and understanding of how English is used by reading as much as possible.

We don’t mean you should spend your time studying grammar and sentence clauses—just read for pleasure and you’ll pick up on things intuitively! You might begin with your favorite book’s English translation or work your way through these famous classics.

5) Make sure there are no mistakes.

When you finish writing something, the last thing you should do is carefully examine it to ensure that it makes sense and that you haven’t made any errors.

Posted in Grammar, Languages, Learning, Writing

Adverbs of frequency

What are adverbs of frequency?

Frequency Adverbs are a type of adverb that describes the frequency of something.They are affect or qualify the meaning of a phrase by telling us how often or frequently something happens.

A frequency adverb is exactly what it sounds like: a temporal adverb. Frequency adverbs always convey how frequently something happens, whether in definite or indeterminate words. Weekly, daily, or yearly are examples of adverbs that describe definite frequency.

Sometimes, often, and rarely are examples of adverbs that describe uncertain frequency without specifying a specific time range.

Adverbs of frequency rules

These simple rules for using frequency adverbs will assist you in doing so correctly:

  • When talking about how often something happens, always utilize adverbs of frequency.
  • Adverbs of frequency are frequently used with the present simple tense to describe routine or recurrent activity.
  • If there is just one verb in a sentence, put the adverb of frequency in the middle of the sentence, after the subject but before the verb. Tom, for example, never flies. He is a regular bus rider.
  • When there are multiple verbs in a sentence, put the adverb of frequency before the main verb. For instance, they have traveled extensively over Europe.
  • When in the negative or making a question, use the adverb of frequency before the main verb. Do you, for example, regularly get up so late?

Examples of Adverbs of Frequency

Each sentence includes an example of a frequency adverb, which is italicized for easy identification.

  • Each egg is rotated once an hour in the incubator.
  • At least once a year, we take a vacation.
  • He’s always late for work.
  • We don’t see John too often.
  • My dentist advised me to floss twice a day.

List of Frequency Adverbs

Many of the most common adverbs of frequency are included in this list; however, there are many other words that can be used in this capacity.

Always

Annually

Constantly

Daily

Eventually

Ever

Frequently

Generally

Hourly

frequently

Later

Monthly

Never

Next

Nightly

Normally

Now

Occasionally

Often

Quarterly

Rarely

Regularly

Sometimes

Soon

Posted in Grammar, Languages, Learning, Listening, Reading, Speaking, Vocabulary, Writing

Top tips to learn English for beginners

It’s difficult to learn a new language, especially when you’re just getting started. If you’re a beginner English language student, consider these suggestions for improving your speaking, reading, and writing skills.

Read books

Start with easy books that are appropriate to your learning level, but don’t be afraid to work your way up to longer books with more extensive vocabulary. Young adult books like Harry Potter and The Hunger Games are good because they’re written in relatively simple language but are still entertaining for adults.Try reading part of an English novel, play, or poem aloud in order to improve your pronunciation and get yourself warmed up for English conversations

Have conversations with native speakers

Whenever feasible, practice your conversation skills with a native speaker to obtain a sense of the English language’s natural speed and inflections. If you’re speaking with a native English speaker, make it clear that you’d prefer them to correct you if you make any mistakes. This will assist you avoid making many of the frequent language and structure mistakes that beginners make.

Watch movies

The majority of English learners think this is one of the most amusing ways to develop their language skills. Choose an English-language film to watch with subtitles in your native language, or watch a film in your native language with English subtitles to see the words on the screen

Keep your dictionary on hand

It’s critical to have an English-to-nativelanguage dictionary on hand, especially when reading, because you’ll almost certainly come across vocabulary words you’ve never heard before. First, try to deduce words from context, then double-check them in your dictionary.

Try to discover one synonym (a word with the same or similar meaning) and one antonym (a word with the opposite meaning) for each new vocabulary term you learn.

practice English writing

Every day, try to write at least a paragraph about whatever is on your mind. You can write about what you did that day, your goals for the next day, the lyrics of a new song you heard, or a short narrative idea you have. Writing every day can help you become more comfortable expressing yourself in English, and writing by hand rather than typing will help you improve your spelling.

Listen to English songs

You can practice English by singing along with your favorite English-language songs if you’re musically inclined. To boost your understanding, print down the lyrics and look up any English words you don’t understand.

Make English part of your daily life

Make sure you practice English on a daily basis, regardless of the study methods you use. This is the most effective technique to improve your language skills and ensure that they stick.

Posted in Languages, Learning, Reading

10 motivational quotes encourage you to learn English language



We don’t always have experts on hand, though. If that’s the case and you need some advice to help you get motivated to learn English, turn to some of the greatest thinkers of the past with these 10 quotes to help you get motivated to learn English.

1-Today a reader, tomorrow a leader. 

– Margaret Fuller

Reading is not just important for acquiring knowledge, it will help you build your vocabulary and range in English, too.

2-The secret of getting ahead is getting started.

– Mark Twain

This one is a great way to help you stop procrastinating. Anything you can do right away will help you get ahead with your goal of learning a language.

3-If you can dream it, you can do it.

– Walt Disney

Walt Disney was well known as a man who made dreams come true, and you can, too. It just takes plenty of hard work.

4-By failing to prepare, you are preparing to fail.

– Benjamin Franklin

Planning is important when you are learning a language so don’t be afraid to put some time into.

5-Ever tried. Ever failed. No matter. Try again. Fail again. Fail better.

– Samuel Beckett

Making mistakes is a natural part of the language learning process. The key is to learn from these mistakes. Don’t be afraid to try out new things in English but always remember to reflect on them and decide what was successful and what you need to keep working on.

6-Live as if you were to die tomorrow. Learn as if you were to live forever.

– Gandhi

Enjoy living in the moment but remember that learning English will prepare you for the future.

7-Do the difficult things while they are easy and do the great things while they are small. A journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step.

– Lao Tzu

Starting early with your learning will mean that you have time to deal with things in small steps. Even a large goal is more approachable if you break it down into smaller ones and just get started.

8-Language is “the infinite use of finite means.”

– Wilhelm von Humboldt

Remember, it is possible to communicate big ideas with relatively limited language. Don’t feel like you need perfect English before you can go out and have interesting conversations with other people.

9-To have another language is to possess a second soul.

– Charlemagne

Learning a new language gives you the chance to be a different person if you want to. Make the most of that chance.

10-Tell me and I forget. Teach me and I remember. Involve me and I learn.

– Benjamin Franklin

Very sensible advice. Now it’s time for you to get involved.

Posted in learning, Self improvement, Writing

How to write an A+ essay

writing an essay doesn’t have to be a challenging battle. In fact, once you understand how to write an essay, and how to take advantage of an outline, the paper will practically write itself for you!.

To help you navigate the art of writing an essay, we’ve provided a guide on how to write a perfect essay, by following easy and simple steps.

1-Pick a Topic and Start Your Research.

Before you sit down at your computer to begin typing up your essay, you must first choose a topic to tackle. Whatever you plan to write about, it is best to do your research before you start writing your essay. While you can certainly do supplemental research as you begin writing, doing the bulk of the research beforehand will help you have a clearer picture of the topic.

If your essay requires you to quote outside sources, gather books or links to reputable websites, so you will need in order to complete the assignment. Research your subject thoroughly, so you feel confident asserting your opinions, while you’re researching, think about the purpose of your essay.

2- Choose Your Thesis

The thesis of your essay is a statement of a claim that lets your reader know what your essay is about. Think of your thesis statement as the topic sentence for your whole essay. But more than just a topic, it gives your audience an idea of your stance. It’s a declarative sentence that you will refer back to throughout your paper.

For example, if you’re writing an essay about Shakespeare’s Hamlet, you might ask: Is Hamlet really insane or is he pretending? Come up with a theory that answers your question, and be sure that you can find evidence that supports your claim. Once you’ve done this, congratulations, you’ve come up with your thesis statement!

3-Write a Body Paragraphs

Many students think that they need to write the perfect introductory paragraph before they can get started on an essay, so they end up wasting a lot of time staring at a blank screen. Don’t get caught up in this trap! Dive right into your writing by inserting your thesis statement in place of your first paragraph, write the first body paragraph of your essay, and keep on going! It’s ok to jump around and leave gaps that you return to later to flush out. This way, you won’t feel the same pressure to start with perfection.

Be sure to give your paragraphs structure, so your writing is clear and stays on topic. Start each paragraph with a topic sentence. Next, give an example, usually a quote from your text or outside source, which supports your topic sentence. Explain what this example means, clarifying any ambiguous or difficult terms that your source may have used.

Finally, and perhaps most importantly, relate the example you just shared back to your thesis, so your reader understands how this example relates to the broader topic of your essay.

4- write the introduction and the conclusion

Basically, your introductory paragraph should first grab your reader’s attention, then give them a broad overview of your topic, leading to your thesis statement.

On the other hand, your conclusion paragraph should do just the opposite. Start with a reiteration of your thesis, move to a summary of what you have covered in your essay, and end with a general statement indicating the significance of your topic in the broader world in general. Go out with a bang! Just because you’re wrapping up your essay in your conclusion doesn’t mean you have to simply repeat everything you already discussed. End on a powerful note to leave your audience with a lasting impression.

5- Revise your essay

Revising your paper is a major step in our guide on how to write the perfect essay. After all, the last thing you want to do is send in a paper riddled with typos and grammatical errors.

Make it a goal to finish writing the bulk of your paper at least one day before it is due. Set your paper aside for a day before revising, so you can look over your work with fresh eyes. Print a copy of your essay and read it aloud, highlighting or making marks on any sentences, words, or phrases that don’t seem quite right.

Often, you can hear awkward phrasing, overused words, and other mistakes much more easily than you see them when you are reading silently. You will also be able to hear if you’ve written something that just doesn’t make sense.

Or if you have a friend, classmate, or private tutor who is willing to read your essay, let them give it a once over to catch any lingering errors.

Posted in Grammar, Languages, Learning, Listening, Reading, Self improvement, Speaking, Vocabulary

IELTS missteps

Before using any study material or answering any questions, you should know the common IELTS pitfalls that may lower your band score. Most of them can be avoided, and keep them in mind when you are practicing or taking the test. So let’s take a look at these mistakes to avoid them and get a higher scores!

Grammar and spelling mistakes

Many candidates lose valuable marks on simple grammar and spelling mistakes. You can avoid these mistakes by checking answers. Check your spelling carefully. Check singular, plural and past forms before the test ends.Check out out posts on common IELTS writing mistakes, IELTS speaking mistakes and IELTS listening mistakes to learn detailed IELTS missteps in these sections. You can get higher scores once you know these missteps and keep them in mind!

Running out of time

You need to allocate your time wisely during the test. You will run out of time if you don’t pay attention to the timing. Some questions take more time to answer, so you have to leave more time for them. In reading test, questions on the last passage usually take more time to think than the others. Therefore, if you don’t know the answer to a question, just move on to the next and come back to it later. In writing test, you should finish the first task in 20 minutes. Otherwise, there won’t be enough time for you to complete the second task.

Lack of preparation

Some candidates have good English communicating skill in social situations, so they believe that they can get high scores on the IELTS even if they don’t prepare a lot. However, taking a test is different from using the language in your daily life because the IELTS tests your overall English ability in social and academic settings. You should do adequate preparation to get familiar with the test format and content.

Memorizing answers

It is a bad idea to memorize answers for the speaking and writing test. There is only a little possibility to meet questions which you have prepared. Even if you are lucky enough to receive a similar question to what you have memorized, the examiners can easily spot it by asking you more questions.

Not following instructions

If you don’t follow instructions, you will definitely lose important marks. Though it seems easy to follow instructions, some candidates are likely to ignore them. Read instructions carefully before answering questions and keep them in mind.

Posted in Languages, Learning, Literature, Reading, Self improvement, Vocabulary, Writing

Top 5 books to improve your English

Reading is one of the most important ways to practice English. It’s funny , relaxing and helps you to improve your comprehension skills and vocabulary.

To help you choose some helpful books, we’ve searched for some of novels and stories that are full of adventures and exciting characters – and better yet, they are easy to read for language learners.

So here are our top 5 books to help you practise English at home.

1. Wonder by R. J. Palacio

Wonder tells the story of August “Auggie” Pullman, a home-schooled fifth-grader living in Manhattan. He has a medical condition that has left his face disfigured. At the start of the novel, his parents decide to enrol him into a private middle school for the first time ever.

Throughout the school year, Auggie faces many challenges because of his appearance. He’s often bullied and beaten by other kids. Against all odds, the kind and courageous little boy manages to make friends.

Wonder made the New York Times bestseller list and was adapted into a hit movie starring Julia Roberts and Owen Wilson as Auggie’s parents and Jacob Tremblay as Auggie.

2.The Phantom Tollbooth by Norton Juster

Published in 1961, The Phantom Tollbooth is still one of the best books for young adults and language learners.

The novel follows Milo, a young boy who goes on a fantasy adventure after receiving a mysterious package that contains a miniature tollbooth. He drives through the tollbooth in his toy car and finds himself in magical places where he meets all kinds of strange characters.

The text is littered with puns and wordplay, which make the book even more fun – and a great opportunity for language learners to practise their skills.

3.The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time by Mark Haddon

This mystery novel – with a mysterious title – takes the reader on a journey into the mind of Christopher John Francis Boone, a 15-year-old boy who sees the world and the people around him in a different way.

Christopher finds himself in the middle of an adventure after he discovers the dead body of the neighbour’s dog, speared by a garden fork. As the story unfolds, Christopher finds out the truth about his mother. He also travels to London alone and takes an A-level maths exam, all in a frenzy of excitement and fear.

We love this book – and the English level is perfect for intermediate learners.

4. Northern Lights by Philip Pullman

Northern Lights – known as The Golden Compass in the US – is the first book in Philip Pullman’s fantasy trilogy His Dark Materials. It was published in 1995 and has since become a classic in the young-adult fantasy genre.

The novel tells the story of twelve-year-old Lyra Belacqua. She’s a brave and curious girl who lives in a world of mythical creatures and parallel universes. Like all humans in this world, she has a “daemon”, a talking spirit animal that constantly accompanies her. Together, they embark on a journey that is filled with danger and excitement.

If you’re looking for a thrilling but easy book to read in English, Northern Lights is a great place to start. You won’t be able to put it down!

5. The Old Man and the Sea – Ernest Hemingway

Ernest Hemingway is well-known for his clear, straightforward writing style and short sentence structure, which is great for English language learners and many people have read it in school.

It’s the courageous tale of a Cuban fisherman and his battle to land a giant marlin and it’s a perfect introduction to Hemingway as an author.

Posted in Grammar, Languages, Learning, Reading, Self improvement, Vocabulary

Compound words and their meanings

English has a number of words that make the language confusing for those who are just learning the language. They include homophones, homonyms, compound words, and word pairs which look and sound similar but have different meanings.

Compound words which can be one word or two can be especially confusing. Here we will look at four of these confusing word pairs; everyday vs every day, anytime vs any time, awhile vs a while, sometime vs some time, and someday vs some day.

Anytime vs Any time

This compound word is an example of how the English language has changed. A few decades ago, the accepted standard was to always write “any time” as two words. A few scholars still consider using the compound version to be lazy writing.

Anytime [any time]

is an adverb which means whenever.In almost all cases the two word version and the compound version mean the same thing and can be used interchangeably.

For example:–

  • I am available anytime if you’d like me to help with your move
  • I am available any time if you’d like me to help with your move.

“Any time” [or anytime]

can also serve as a conjunction.

– Anytime we had the chance we would go for a swim.

– Any time we had the chance we would go for a swim.

There are a few instances where any time should be two words.

When the phrase is used with a preposition like “at” two words should be used.

– I will gladly help at any time of the day or night.When you are referring to an amount of time the two word version is used.

– Do you have any time to review my test today?.

Everyday vs Every day

Like many compound words, “everyday” and “every day” are typically more confusing in spoken English than in written English since most speakers do not parse the words correctly.

Everyday

 – This is an adjective; which means “mundane”, “typical”, “ordinary”, or “standard”. The phrase “everyday routine” refers to a normal, ordinary day where nothing unusual occurred. As the English language becomes even less formal, you will occasionally hear people use the word as a noun, sort of a shorthand version of “everyday chores.”

Every day

– When written as two words it means “each day”, “every” is an adjective for “day.” One easy way of checking your usage is the replace the work “every” with the word “each” and checking that your sentence still makes sense. For example, “each day routine” is not correct whereas “each day I drink a glass of milk” does.

Someday vs Some day

Someday

– This compound word is an adverb and means “at an indefinite time in the future.”

– Someday I will invest in a new mobile phone but the old one will be ok until I do so.

Some day

– Some day is an adjective, some, and a noun, day. Some means “unknown” or “unspecified”.

When paired with day it means a single day that is unknown.– The term paper is due some day in May.

Posted in Learning, learning, Reading, Self improvement

Most effective online learning tips

  • Choose the best time and place to learn

Choosing when to learn and study is very important in terms of maximizing your energy and learning more efficiently. We all have different energy levels over the course of the day, and some of us prefer to do certain activities at certain points in the day, being able to strike a balance between your energy and alertness levels while also considering the time of day is crucial when it comes to learning and studying and even doing other things, another factor that can come into play aside from time is location.

The atmosphere around you can contribute greatly to the quality of your studying and learning time.

  • Taking notes

How good your notes are will determine how useful studying them later will be. A sign of good note-taking is when the notes are written or seen in such a way that you know the sequence of information that was brought up revolving around them.

Some other strategies to consider that can help you out are the following:

  • If you’re in a class that’s given assigned reading, read through it before the next class. Do the same with your previous notes.
  • Keep your notes from each subject together. Have notebooks for every class or topic you’re deeply exploring. This way, you avoid confusing them or mixing up information while reviewing them.
  • Always write down the main points of the topic so you can get a brief but solid overview of the subject.

  • Study in groups

discussing topics with other people around you is another way that you can help improve your learning. This online learning tip is a touch different from the previous tip because it’s more of a collaborative approach to understanding something.

  • Avoid distraction

Sometimes, distraction comes from outside sources that are beyond our control. However, there are also several other things that are internal that can be distracting.

These are things like our cell phones or having various tabs on your computer up while you’re reading or studying something else. We don’t often think about those as distractions, but they can and will pull us away from learning. So you need to Turn off your cell phone, Close down tabs or even blocking access to certain sites during a period of time.

  • Using a learning strategy that works for you

There are four methods for us to learn:

  • learning through sight.
  • learning through hearing.
  • learning through reading and writing.
  • learning through action.

We often have a mix of each one of these things. However, there is definitely one style of learning that each of us prefers over the other if we can get away with it. Knowing which type of learner you are most dominant in can help you devise strategies and techniques around your studying habits whenever possible. Of course, you can still use the other methods loosely or may have to rely on them more in certain circumstances.

Posted in Languages, learning, Self improvement, Speaking, Vocabulary

Important phrases for a job interview

In job interviews you have to be convincing , and to show why you want this job also why you deserve it . So you need to speak confidently and to have good expressions to convince your interviewer about your personality, strengths, experience and why you want the job .

phrases to describe your personality :

  • Trustworthy: someone who you can rely on.
  • Proactive: someone who takes steps to complete tasks without supervision.
  • Committed: a person who is loyal to a project or person.

phrases to describe your strengths :

  • Speak foreign languages.
  • Communicate well.
  • The ability to multitask.
  • Perform to a deadline.
  • Solve problems.

– phrases to describe your experience :

  • I studied at the University of ……………….
  • I have five years’ experience as a waitress/in retail/as a teacher
  • I worked for ………..as a lawyer.
  • I worked in …….. for seven years and was promoted to manager in my second year.
  •  I can say my top 3 skills are: ……………….,…………. and……………….. .

– phrases to describe your goals for the future and why you want this job:

  • I feel my skills set is a perfect fit for your team and I can contribute by…
  • I believe your company is an important player in its industry
  • I’m looking to further my skills as a barista/in hospitality, as a childcare worker/in early childhood education
  • I’d love to work here because I ………….. .

phrases to thank the interviewer at the end :

  • I want you to know that I am very thankful for this.
  • It was a pleasure meeting you .
  • before I leave I want to thank you for the opportunity.
  • thank you very much for your time . I’ll be waiting for your call .