Posted in Languages, Learning, Speaking

The Best English Pronunciation online Dictionaries

You possibly already use a dictionary to translate English words, however on-line or digital dictionaries can provide many extra benefits, such as pronunciation guides.These types of dictionaries can be beneficial for practicing English pronunciation, and they may be available on-line for free.

Here are a number of the great pronunciation dictionaries you could discover and use online.

  • Merriam-Webster Dictionary

Merriam-Webster is likewise recognized as “America’s most beneficial and famous dictionary.” It’s no wonder then that it’s here on this list! The dictionary gives specific definitions and information about the phrases you look up, in addition to clear, good-quality audio pronunciations.

You also can download the free app version of this dictionary, which comes with some unique features. With the app, you can look for words by speaking them out loud into your device’s microphone—that is awesome for when you don’t know how to spell a word, but it’s also excellent speaking practice. If there are any words that interest you, you can keep them into your own “favorites” list.

  • Oxford Learner’s Dictionaries

Oxford’s on-line dictionary, supplied by the well-reputable Oxford University Press, is a great useful resource for amateur learners. Sometimes, dictionaries can provide quite a few information that may make things confusing—Oxford’s dictionary takes out a lot of the confusion and offers you the primary stuff you need. The definitions are written in an easy-to-recognize manner and you get lots of example sentences that show you the way the phrase is used.

The dictionary has pronunciation options: you may pay attention to the phrase spoken in British English or in American English. The pronunciations are accomplished by unique male and female humans (now no longer robots!), which may be exceptional to your listening practice.

  • WordReference

WordReference is a beneficial multilingual dictionary. It helps translations for a number of languages, so in case your local language is included, you may find phrases in English by writing it out on your language, or look for English phrases and get translations on your language. This could be very useful while you need to ensure you’re getting the proper translations.

WordReference additionally helps you to pay attention to audio pronunciations in distinctive English accents, greater than many different dictionaries. Most on-line dictionaries may also simply provide one British pronunciation and one American pronunciation, however WordReference additionally specifies different particular accents including Irish, Scottish, American Southern or even Jamaican. After you look up a word, you could click on on the “Listen” button to choose the accent you need to listen and alternate the speed of the audio.

  • Collins Online Dictionary

This dictionary gives maximum of what the alternative indexed dictionaries have, but with a few more audio features. Once you look up a phrase, Collins dictionary additionally gives audio pronunciation of the phrase in its different forms (which include in past tense or participle form). There are even audio pronunciations for the instance sentences that show the phrase in use, which may be very beneficial while you need to exercise speaking in complete phrases.

Collins dictionary offers barely different definitions: the first “Collins” definition, the second “British English” definition and the third “American English” definition. With every definition section, you may listen both the British or American pronunciation of the word. In a few cases, there may also even be a video clip of a actual person pronouncing the word!

  • Forvo

Forvo is a user-generated pronunciation guide wherein local speakers post audio clips of themselves pronouncing certain phrases or phrases. You can search for a word, study its definition and pay attention to how different people from different locations say it. There also are pronunciations for complete sentences and phrases as well!

Forvo is well-appreciated due to the fact that real people are those who speaking the words. You also can see how certain speakers are ranked of their pronunciations; the pronunciations with the maximum likes can be the ones you need to focus on.

Posted in Learning, Reading, Writing

How to improve your written English skills

Writing in English is typically thought to be easier than speaking in English by many language learners. Usually, this simply means that people find it easier to write correctly when it comes to grammar, but they ignore fluency and readability. These are crucial if you plan to continue your education in an English-speaking country or if you seek a career that demands English.

1)Write as if you were speaking.

Although this isn’t always the case, writing like you talk can help improve the fluidity and readability of your workThat doesn’t imply you should use a lot of slang terms and uh, eh, and er in your writing. However, consider how people speak in basic English and how natural it sounds, and strive to achieve the same effortless flow in your writing.

2) Acquire new vocabulary.

It goes without saying that expanding your vocabulary will help you write with more confidence and fluency. Create a personal dictionary if you haven’t already. Write down and translate any unfamiliar words you come across, then test yourself to see how many you can recall before utilizing them in your writing and interactions.

3)Make it a habit to write every day.

Practice makes perfect, as the saying goes. So the only way to get better at writing is to keep doing it. Even 5 or 10 minutes each day, if done consistently, will significantly enhance your written English. You may keep an English-language journal, write a blog about your experiences learning English and living in a new country, or even begin creating your social media bio.

4)read lots

You can enhance your writing skills even if you don’t write. You may improve your vocabulary and understanding of how English is used by reading as much as possible.

We don’t mean you should spend your time studying grammar and sentence clauses—just read for pleasure and you’ll pick up on things intuitively! You might begin with your favorite book’s English translation or work your way through these famous classics.

5) Make sure there are no mistakes.

When you finish writing something, the last thing you should do is carefully examine it to ensure that it makes sense and that you haven’t made any errors.

Posted in Grammar, Languages, Learning, Listening, Reading, Speaking, Vocabulary, Writing

Top tips to learn English for beginners

It’s difficult to learn a new language, especially when you’re just getting started. If you’re a beginner English language student, consider these suggestions for improving your speaking, reading, and writing skills.

Read books

Start with easy books that are appropriate to your learning level, but don’t be afraid to work your way up to longer books with more extensive vocabulary. Young adult books like Harry Potter and The Hunger Games are good because they’re written in relatively simple language but are still entertaining for adults.Try reading part of an English novel, play, or poem aloud in order to improve your pronunciation and get yourself warmed up for English conversations

Have conversations with native speakers

Whenever feasible, practice your conversation skills with a native speaker to obtain a sense of the English language’s natural speed and inflections. If you’re speaking with a native English speaker, make it clear that you’d prefer them to correct you if you make any mistakes. This will assist you avoid making many of the frequent language and structure mistakes that beginners make.

Watch movies

The majority of English learners think this is one of the most amusing ways to develop their language skills. Choose an English-language film to watch with subtitles in your native language, or watch a film in your native language with English subtitles to see the words on the screen

Keep your dictionary on hand

It’s critical to have an English-to-nativelanguage dictionary on hand, especially when reading, because you’ll almost certainly come across vocabulary words you’ve never heard before. First, try to deduce words from context, then double-check them in your dictionary.

Try to discover one synonym (a word with the same or similar meaning) and one antonym (a word with the opposite meaning) for each new vocabulary term you learn.

practice English writing

Every day, try to write at least a paragraph about whatever is on your mind. You can write about what you did that day, your goals for the next day, the lyrics of a new song you heard, or a short narrative idea you have. Writing every day can help you become more comfortable expressing yourself in English, and writing by hand rather than typing will help you improve your spelling.

Listen to English songs

You can practice English by singing along with your favorite English-language songs if you’re musically inclined. To boost your understanding, print down the lyrics and look up any English words you don’t understand.

Make English part of your daily life

Make sure you practice English on a daily basis, regardless of the study methods you use. This is the most effective technique to improve your language skills and ensure that they stick.

Posted in Languages, Learning, Reading

10 motivational quotes encourage you to learn English language



We don’t always have experts on hand, though. If that’s the case and you need some advice to help you get motivated to learn English, turn to some of the greatest thinkers of the past with these 10 quotes to help you get motivated to learn English.

1-Today a reader, tomorrow a leader. 

– Margaret Fuller

Reading is not just important for acquiring knowledge, it will help you build your vocabulary and range in English, too.

2-The secret of getting ahead is getting started.

– Mark Twain

This one is a great way to help you stop procrastinating. Anything you can do right away will help you get ahead with your goal of learning a language.

3-If you can dream it, you can do it.

– Walt Disney

Walt Disney was well known as a man who made dreams come true, and you can, too. It just takes plenty of hard work.

4-By failing to prepare, you are preparing to fail.

– Benjamin Franklin

Planning is important when you are learning a language so don’t be afraid to put some time into.

5-Ever tried. Ever failed. No matter. Try again. Fail again. Fail better.

– Samuel Beckett

Making mistakes is a natural part of the language learning process. The key is to learn from these mistakes. Don’t be afraid to try out new things in English but always remember to reflect on them and decide what was successful and what you need to keep working on.

6-Live as if you were to die tomorrow. Learn as if you were to live forever.

– Gandhi

Enjoy living in the moment but remember that learning English will prepare you for the future.

7-Do the difficult things while they are easy and do the great things while they are small. A journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step.

– Lao Tzu

Starting early with your learning will mean that you have time to deal with things in small steps. Even a large goal is more approachable if you break it down into smaller ones and just get started.

8-Language is “the infinite use of finite means.”

– Wilhelm von Humboldt

Remember, it is possible to communicate big ideas with relatively limited language. Don’t feel like you need perfect English before you can go out and have interesting conversations with other people.

9-To have another language is to possess a second soul.

– Charlemagne

Learning a new language gives you the chance to be a different person if you want to. Make the most of that chance.

10-Tell me and I forget. Teach me and I remember. Involve me and I learn.

– Benjamin Franklin

Very sensible advice. Now it’s time for you to get involved.

Posted in Grammar, Speaking, Writing

Why is it important to learn English Phrases??

People use words, but they speak in phrases.When you study a language, you often focus on learning one word at a time.And it’s important to know what individual (single) words mean.

But learning whole phrases also has a lot of benefits (good effects) for English learners, here are some of these benefits.

Understanding spoken English

Learning common English phrases makes it so much easier to understand what you hear.

These are phrases that are used all the time (often). So keep your ears open, and listen carefully, you’ll hear them used a lot.

When you learn more English phrases, understanding spoken English will be easy as pie (very easy) for you.

Reading faster

Phrases group are several words together in a written text. When you start seeing phrases as a single unit, with a specific meaning, you’ll be able to read English faster.Rather than having to take time to think about what each individual English word means, you’ll be able to group some of the words together in phrases as you read.

Since you’ll recognize (know) what the phrases mean, you can spend less time reading through a text—but you’ll understand what it means even better than if you just knew what each word meant.

Improving your writing skill

Even your English writing can improve as you learn more English phrases. It’ll become more natural, reflecting (looking like) how native English speakers would write.

Understanding the meaning better

a phrase often means something different than the words that create it.

For example, take the phrase, “a piece of cake.”

A piece is a part of something. In this case, it’s a slice.

A cake is a sweet, baked food, usually made with flour and sugar.

Put these words together as “a piece of cake,” and you get a phrase that means “very easy.”

Posted in Grammar, Languages, Learning, Reading, Self improvement, Vocabulary

Compound words and their meanings

English has a number of words that make the language confusing for those who are just learning the language. They include homophones, homonyms, compound words, and word pairs which look and sound similar but have different meanings.

Compound words which can be one word or two can be especially confusing. Here we will look at four of these confusing word pairs; everyday vs every day, anytime vs any time, awhile vs a while, sometime vs some time, and someday vs some day.

Anytime vs Any time

This compound word is an example of how the English language has changed. A few decades ago, the accepted standard was to always write “any time” as two words. A few scholars still consider using the compound version to be lazy writing.

Anytime [any time]

is an adverb which means whenever.In almost all cases the two word version and the compound version mean the same thing and can be used interchangeably.

For example:–

  • I am available anytime if you’d like me to help with your move
  • I am available any time if you’d like me to help with your move.

“Any time” [or anytime]

can also serve as a conjunction.

– Anytime we had the chance we would go for a swim.

– Any time we had the chance we would go for a swim.

There are a few instances where any time should be two words.

When the phrase is used with a preposition like “at” two words should be used.

– I will gladly help at any time of the day or night.When you are referring to an amount of time the two word version is used.

– Do you have any time to review my test today?.

Everyday vs Every day

Like many compound words, “everyday” and “every day” are typically more confusing in spoken English than in written English since most speakers do not parse the words correctly.

Everyday

 – This is an adjective; which means “mundane”, “typical”, “ordinary”, or “standard”. The phrase “everyday routine” refers to a normal, ordinary day where nothing unusual occurred. As the English language becomes even less formal, you will occasionally hear people use the word as a noun, sort of a shorthand version of “everyday chores.”

Every day

– When written as two words it means “each day”, “every” is an adjective for “day.” One easy way of checking your usage is the replace the work “every” with the word “each” and checking that your sentence still makes sense. For example, “each day routine” is not correct whereas “each day I drink a glass of milk” does.

Someday vs Some day

Someday

– This compound word is an adverb and means “at an indefinite time in the future.”

– Someday I will invest in a new mobile phone but the old one will be ok until I do so.

Some day

– Some day is an adjective, some, and a noun, day. Some means “unknown” or “unspecified”.

When paired with day it means a single day that is unknown.– The term paper is due some day in May.

Posted in Learning, learning, Reading, Self improvement

Most effective online learning tips

  • Choose the best time and place to learn

Choosing when to learn and study is very important in terms of maximizing your energy and learning more efficiently. We all have different energy levels over the course of the day, and some of us prefer to do certain activities at certain points in the day, being able to strike a balance between your energy and alertness levels while also considering the time of day is crucial when it comes to learning and studying and even doing other things, another factor that can come into play aside from time is location.

The atmosphere around you can contribute greatly to the quality of your studying and learning time.

  • Taking notes

How good your notes are will determine how useful studying them later will be. A sign of good note-taking is when the notes are written or seen in such a way that you know the sequence of information that was brought up revolving around them.

Some other strategies to consider that can help you out are the following:

  • If you’re in a class that’s given assigned reading, read through it before the next class. Do the same with your previous notes.
  • Keep your notes from each subject together. Have notebooks for every class or topic you’re deeply exploring. This way, you avoid confusing them or mixing up information while reviewing them.
  • Always write down the main points of the topic so you can get a brief but solid overview of the subject.

  • Study in groups

discussing topics with other people around you is another way that you can help improve your learning. This online learning tip is a touch different from the previous tip because it’s more of a collaborative approach to understanding something.

  • Avoid distraction

Sometimes, distraction comes from outside sources that are beyond our control. However, there are also several other things that are internal that can be distracting.

These are things like our cell phones or having various tabs on your computer up while you’re reading or studying something else. We don’t often think about those as distractions, but they can and will pull us away from learning. So you need to Turn off your cell phone, Close down tabs or even blocking access to certain sites during a period of time.

  • Using a learning strategy that works for you

There are four methods for us to learn:

  • learning through sight.
  • learning through hearing.
  • learning through reading and writing.
  • learning through action.

We often have a mix of each one of these things. However, there is definitely one style of learning that each of us prefers over the other if we can get away with it. Knowing which type of learner you are most dominant in can help you devise strategies and techniques around your studying habits whenever possible. Of course, you can still use the other methods loosely or may have to rely on them more in certain circumstances.

Posted in Languages, learning, Self improvement, Speaking, Vocabulary

Important phrases for a job interview

In job interviews you have to be convincing , and to show why you want this job also why you deserve it . So you need to speak confidently and to have good expressions to convince your interviewer about your personality, strengths, experience and why you want the job .

phrases to describe your personality :

  • Trustworthy: someone who you can rely on.
  • Proactive: someone who takes steps to complete tasks without supervision.
  • Committed: a person who is loyal to a project or person.

phrases to describe your strengths :

  • Speak foreign languages.
  • Communicate well.
  • The ability to multitask.
  • Perform to a deadline.
  • Solve problems.

– phrases to describe your experience :

  • I studied at the University of ……………….
  • I have five years’ experience as a waitress/in retail/as a teacher
  • I worked for ………..as a lawyer.
  • I worked in …….. for seven years and was promoted to manager in my second year.
  •  I can say my top 3 skills are: ……………….,…………. and……………….. .

– phrases to describe your goals for the future and why you want this job:

  • I feel my skills set is a perfect fit for your team and I can contribute by…
  • I believe your company is an important player in its industry
  • I’m looking to further my skills as a barista/in hospitality, as a childcare worker/in early childhood education
  • I’d love to work here because I ………….. .

phrases to thank the interviewer at the end :

  • I want you to know that I am very thankful for this.
  • It was a pleasure meeting you .
  • before I leave I want to thank you for the opportunity.
  • thank you very much for your time . I’ll be waiting for your call .
Posted in Grammar, Languages, learning, Self improvement, Vocabulary

Your best guide for the verb tenses

There are 12 main tenses in the English language, the result of the following combination of tenses and aspects:

  • Present
  • Past
  • Future
  • Present perfect
  • Past perfect
  • Future perfect
  • Present progressive
  • Past progressive
  • Future progressive
  • Present perfect progressive
  • Past perfect progressive
  • Future perfect progressive

The Simple Verb Tenses

To begin, let’s take a closer look at the simple present, past, and future verb tenses. 

Present

The simple present tense indicates actions that are habitual or generally true.

  • I like sushi.
  • The weather in Texas is hot.
  • When we visit Bologna, we walk under miles of porticos.

In particular, notice the use of the simple present when stating a habitual action. It would sound incorrect to say, “I eat pasta,” in response to the question, “What are you doing right now?” Instead, you would use the progressive tense: “I am eating pasta.” 

You do use the simple present to describe a routine action, though.

  • He paints portraits.
  • I eat fresh strawberries in the summer.
  • The dogs bark whenever she takes a conference call.

You also use the simple present with stative verbs , which indicate possession, senses, emotions, or states of being.

  • I love that new song.
  • That shirt belongs to me.
  • She thinks spinach is delicious.

Past 

The simple past tense indicates an action that is already complete. To form the past tense of a regular verb in English, you add the suffix “ed.” Sadly, for ESL speakers, there are a number of irregular verbs that do not follow this rule, such as felt, came, and thought.

  • I donated to the food drive yesterday.
  • He felt nauseous after riding the roller coaster.
  • Thousands of Chinese immigrants came to the United States in the nineteenth century.

Future 

The simple future tense indicates an action or state of being that will take place in the future. You form it by adding auxiliary words (such as “will,” “shall,” or “am going to”) to the main verb.

  • I am going to love my trip to Hawaii.
  • The principal shall make the announcement tomorrow.
  • He’ll bring a casserole to the potluck if you don’t have enough food. 

The Progressive Verb Tenses To describe actions that are ongoing in the past, present, or future, you apply the progressive aspect to each of the three simple tenses. The three progressive tenses can be formed by adding the correct form of the auxiliary verb “to be” to verbs ending in “ing.”

The Progressive Verb Tenses

To describe actions that are ongoing in the past, present, or future, you apply the progressive aspect to each of the three simple tenses.

Present Progressive

The present progressive tense describes an ongoing action that is happening right now. The action began in the past and will continue into the future.

  • She’s filing the divorce papers.
  • I’m checking my social media accounts.
  • The neighbor’s dog is barking loudly and enthusiastically.

Past Progressive

The past progressive tense indicates an action that was ongoing in the past. It began at some point and may continue after a second action has taken place.

  • She was talking to her friend when their biology class ended.
  • I was watering my plants when three cop cars sped down the street.
  • They were driving up the coast when it began snowing so hard they could barely see.

Future Progressive

The future progressive tense indicates an ongoing action that will take place in relation to some future event.

  • I will be coming home for the holidays.
  • She’ll be heading out the door the minute she wins the lottery.
  • We will be singing the same song, undoubtedly, when our daughter graduates from college. 

The Perfect Verb Tenses

The perfect verb tense describes an action or state of being that is finished or already completed. You form each of the three perfect tenses by adding the correct form of the auxiliary verb “to have” to the past participle of the verb. Perfect tenses can be used with dynamic or stative verbs.

Present Perfect

The present perfect tense indicates an accomplishment, experience, or action that occurred over an indefinite period of time. The action may have ended sometime before the present moment or may still be happening. The present perfect and the simple past are sometimes used interchangeably in the English language. In fact, the difference between them boils down to context.

  • I have been horseback riding.
  • The train has been delayed until future notice.
  • The English language has been transformed several times since the Anglo-Saxon invasion.

Past Perfect

The past perfect tense indicates that a past action was completed before another action took place.

  • Gwen had invested in the company just before it went bankrupt.
  • We had argued for peace, but the opposition decided to wage war.
  • I had fixed the drywall cracks before the mud storm shifted the home’s foundation again.

Future Perfect

The future perfect verb tense indicates an action that will have been completed in some future time.

  • The dogs will have been fed before we arrive home.
  • She will have been exhausted by playing with her nieces and nephews.
  • By the time we see their light, stars will have been already alive for billions of years.

The Perfect Progressive Verb Tenses

The perfect progressive tense describes an action that occurred in the past and is ongoing in relation to some past, present, or future point in time. While the perfect tense indicates a completed action, the three perfect progressive tenses describe continuous action.

Present Perfect Progressive 

The present perfect progressive tense describes an action that began in the past and is still ongoing in the present.

  • I have been watching Netflix all morning.
  • They have been trying to build their new desk.
  • The lawyers have been eager to get the testimony of a key witness.

Past Perfect Progressive

The past perfect progressive tense describes an action that was ongoing in the past but stopped before the present time, often because of another action.

  • They had been working until the pizza arrived.
  • I had been shopping for Christmas presents until I exceeded my credit limit.
  • She had been daydreaming about visiting Italy for so long that it felt strange to actually be there.

Future Perfect Progressive

The future perfect progressive tense indicates an action in the future that will be ongoing and may continue past the time of another event, though the second future event often implies the cessation of the event that is ongoing.

  • I will have been working for ten hours by the time I go to bed.
  • The legal team will have been compiling research even if the parties agree to settle.
  • She will have been eating meat for 40 years if she decides to become a vegetarian in the New Year.
Posted in Grammar, Languages, learning, Reading, Self improvement, Writing

Kinds of noun

  • What is noun

A noun is a part of speech that names a person, place, thing, idea, action or quality.

  • Kinds of nouns
  • Common noun

Nonspecific people, places, things or ideas.

Man, city, relegion etc…….

  • Proper noun

Specific people, places, things etc……

Albert Einstein, London etc……

  • Abstract noun

Something that you can not perceive with your five senses.

Belief, bride, happiness etc…..

  • Concrete noun

Something that you can perceive with your five senses.

Apple, llion, eyes, flower…….

  • Countable noun

Something that can be counted, like pencils, trees, cars etc……….

  • Uncountable noun

Something that can not be counted, like snow, rice, water, food etc……….

  • Compound noun

Made up of two or more words, like sunflower, textbook, snowball, etc…..

  • Collective noun

Refer to a group of things as one whole.

Bunch, audience, flock, group

  • Singular noun

Refer to one thing, person or idea.

Cat, ship, hero etc……

  • Plural noun

Refer to more than one thing, person or idea.

Dogs, cats, ships etc…….